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and rwanda's support of congolese rebels. this is a little more than 2-1/2 hours. >> we will come to order and good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today's hearing will examine u.s. policy in the democratic republic of congo, this was exacerbated by rwanda's intervention in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the release of three united nations reports this year. these reports confirm rwanda's support of militias who have ravaged and continue to plague this region. the state's--unable to testify at the sept. 19 hearing on this issue. the subcommittee promised to follow up was available to testify. the aftermath of the genocide, the administration turned a blind eye to reports of rwanda and plundering of resources from the d r c and support for rebels who have devastated eastern congo and its people. built over the clinton administration's causal failure responding effectively to the genocide in rwanda has led his subsequent u.s. administration being reluctant to criticize the government of rwanda. with these u.n. reports on that behavior, we must overcome our re
the opportunity meet with the president of rwanda. did the officials with whom you met with, did they meet, i should say, it's a dispute that? and went secretary sherman met with the president, some months back, several weeks back, did she get a report back from him? did he tell her this is all rubbish, not true? or did he admit to anything? secondly one of my most disappointed waste today, and marino i think are you out further on the suspension of foreign military financing that we're talking about on $200,000, when the 2006 act at least envision a more robust and credible sanctions against the country that is aiding and abetting that there is organizations like m23. so if you could speak to whether or not additional sanctions are under consideration at least against rwanda, and specific individuals as well. >> mr. chairman, let me ask, answer the first question. you were correct, as i stated earlier, i and my british and french colleagues met for several hours with the president, and we met for an extended period of time with the other president has was the foreign minister and prime minis
and backed by rwanda. rebels captured the eastern congo city of goma. this is just two and a half hours. >> the committee will come to order. good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today will regard the policy in the democratic republic of congo. this conflict was exacerbated by rwanda's interventions in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the release of three united nations reports this year. these reports confirm rwanda supported militia who have lavished in continue to plague this region. the state department was unavailable to testify at her september 19. on this issue and the promise that the time to follow up with available to testify. in the aftermath of genocide, they've turned a blind eye to reports of resources from the drc and support issuing congo and its people. it seems the guilt of the clinton administration's colossal failure responding effectively as they did not commit genocide in rwanda has led to subsequent been reluctant to criticize her one day. with these u.n. reports on that government's behavior in the drc, as an ngo letter points out c
the course of the mandate, the group found since the outfit of the m23 rebellion, governments of rwanda provided tracked military support, facilitate recruitment, encouraged the congolese army and delivered arms, ammunition, political advice and intelligence to the rebels. at the strategic level, ronda has spearheaded fundraising and membership for the political cutters, nominating political leadership and directly in strict amendment demands to be made before the congolese government. the rwandan army is not only set up a recruitment at work to ensure steady supply of new shirts, including children, but they've integrated their own officers within m23 chain of command on the ground. during all major -- journal nature military operations, the army has deployed dozens of additional troops to reinforce m23 and their principal attack such as the recent offense uncle bob. all members of the community have respected the might of diplomatic and financial pressure, the group has some pressure at the has only increased with time. precisely because m23 defect to command culminate with general ja
between the drc and the eastern neighbors especially rwanda. outside support in particular from rwanda has enabled m23 to be a threat it is today. imposes a serious challenge to the efforts to stablize eastern drc and ensure the protection of civilians. as president obama made clear yesterday in a phone call with rwanda montana, any support to m23 it inconsistent with the desire for stability and peace. a lot the military remains a valuable and capable partner in peace keeping operation outside the immediate region based on the support for m23 the administration has suspended rwanda's foreign military financing. as a situation in eastern congo go ons, we will continue to monitor reports of external support closely and respond appropriately including by reviewing our systems. inside they are prioritizing security sector reform. this means working with the partner and the drk that addresses all three elements. we must work to develop more professional forces that respect human rights and protection the drc integrity and population inspect this regard, the defense department has provided trai
's over comments she allegedly made during the 1994 rwanda genocide and weeks after losing the biggest race of his life, mitt romney has found a new job. that's ahead. but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] dayquil doesn't treat that. huh? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus rushes relief to all your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members a
to the united nations, susan rice comes under fire again. this time, it's over rwanda. let's go "outfront. >>> good evening, welcome, everyone. "outfront" tonight breaking news, president obama puts the syrian president on notice. the president is reacting to new evidence that assad's regime has started mixing chemicals to make deadly sarin gas, adding to its massive stockpile of chemical weapons. >> and today i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> assad is on the edge of president obama's so-called red line against syria. the president said this summer that syria's use or movement of chemical weapons could mean u.s. intervention. so outfront tonight, barbara star. how exactly -- how clear is the evidence that they are moving in a new step with chemical weapons. >> it was just over the weekend in the last few days the intelligence began coming in.
, rwanda's support for military financing has been suspended. we will continue to monitor reports of an external support and respond appropriately, including reviewing our assistance. we are working with our partners and the drc to develop a comprehensive approach that addresses all three elements, the congolese defense forces, military justice, and the police. we must work to develop a more professional forces that respect human rights and protect territorial integrity in population. the defense department has provided training to the congolese military, including training of a light infantry battalion in 2010. sexual and gender based violence prevention and training were incorporated in every aspect of this effort. in addition to the ongoing training, the defense department's as included logistics, exercise participation, basic military intelligence training, humanitarian assistance and he military action. moving forward, the defense department stands ready to work with our colleagues to determine the best way ahead including providing additional infantry training. the scale of
have key partners in that area that we've worked with in yuge and rwanda as we've dealt with swigses in africa and the instability coming out of the drc is a threat to all of that. we have seen in recent months that africa is increasingly important in our national security interests. the instability there is giving rise to many al qaeda inspired insurgencies and that instability threatens our securities. and one of the biggest purposes is to get a greater feel for what the department of defense can do in that roibling to help. the big -- region can do to help. the biggest problem is a lack of governance, lack of rule of law and just a rogue gallery of war lords, revolutionaries and violent groups of individuals that have taken advantage of that ungoverned space. and created no end of problems. so building towards greater stability and security in that region has to be our focus. i know the d.o.d. has done some work in that region. we're currently working with the ugenden army in dealing with the lord's resistance army one that has helped to destabilize the drc but we have also in the
third story out front tonight, ambassador rice's role in rwanda. a group of religious leaders have opened a new line of attack on the woman believed to be the leading candidate for secretary of state. by questioning rice's role in the clinton administration during the rwanda again side. rick warren tweeted this. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the again side in rwanda. before that tweet was deleted. a 2002 article claims rice said this. if we use the word again side and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november congressional election? our foreign affairs reporter is out front tonight. elise, does the criticism against rice add up, do you think? >> i don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador ric
department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and not the president's mid term when it comes to iran and north koreas of the world. >> paul: is that enough to stop, mary the president from getting the secretary of state that he wants and with john kerry mentioned the senator from massachusetts as the alternative to susan rice, would he be any better. >> i'm surprised that the preside
they are unlikely to go as far as withdrawing embassadors. -- embassadors -- ambassadors. >> rwanda has rejected a report that says it was involved in the rebel goma capture rebel in congo -- the democratic republic of congo. the drc is now back in control -- control. in the uk, starbucks says it will start paying corporation tax. the company has nearly 1/3 of the uk coffee shop market, but has only paid the tax once in the past 15 years. starbucks has been stung by public criticism of its actions. you're watching "bbc world news america." still to come on tonight's program, nearly 25 years after a deadly gas attack, one kurdish town is still trying to identify the scores of people who died. to japan now, where the authorities are trying to figure out how tunnel collapsed on sunday, killing at least nine people. huge concrete slabs in the tunnel smashed on to cars. that started a fire on the main route from tokyo to central japan. we report now on that story. >> only this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought -- early this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was
, i saw earlier a crossed that had come all the way from rwanda. it was sent to this school in connecticut for the memorial. as you have seen here over the last few days, do you have a sense that the town has almost gone from a state of shock into a real grief and anger? >> this is the stage that everyone he last had anything to do with this tragedy will tell you this is one the great turns to anger. particularly in a case like this or they're so difficult to find any rational reason for what happens. the sense i also get is that people will tell you they do not want to be defined by what has happened here. in the and they want their strength and their love for their children, they want that. they do not want to be defined by what has happened. it is tragic. the yes, it feels like the entire world has descended on the tragedy. people here are resilience. they feel that ultimately they will be able to move on. >> on the issue of the control, people here have had very mixed reaction to what president obama said last night. >> this is the quintessential new england town. this i
rwanda to do and i would like to go out there and visit them. i signed off last year in 2011 the urban agriculture " ordinance. the ordinance for us was another reflection of city policy with the board of supervisors that we wanted to increase the opportunities for folks to grow crops. to grow agriculture, to be able to sell it if they so wish to to so we could have folks that already have that experience, but not necessarily at the corporate level. our urban agriculture is important to us. we have identified a number of abandoned lots all over the city and we would love to again excite volunteers and people who are interested in urban agriculture and the ability to distribute fresh produce to people who are in need. allow that to happen, working with our school district to see what can happen on their lots so the urban agriculture ordinance is something that you might want to take a look at. and finally, with our recreation and park department, the community gardens program, another broad program we have. taking lots, whether they are a few hundred square feet or thousands of square f
." >> "gorillas in the wind." >> this is in rwanda. that's a female. not something you catch on camera often, especially this close. she doesn't seem to be alarmed by the camera, and she just sits down, starts enjoying a little bamboo chute. >> she's eating a lot looks a little fatter. >> look at that belly. >> sounded potent. what's your girlfriend smell like? talk about a rare moment. >>
. >> this is in rwanda and that's a female mountain gorilla. not something you catch on camera very often. especially this close. now she doesn't seem to be alarmed by the camera and shes just sits down, starts enjoying a little bamboo shoot. >> got that belly. eating a lot of that stuff. >> keep watching. >> she looks right into the camera for a solid ten seconds like something is coming here. >> she hikes up to do it. does a -- well, i'm -- >> okay. please tell me this is real. >> people are asking. this was shot by the guy who was a client of natural world safari, named richard. we believe that he just captured this moment on camera. >> she does look kind of bloated. >> i know. >> she looks a little gassy. >> she has a belly. >> that sounded pretty potent. >> what does a gorilla fart smell like? talk about a rare moment. >> that didn't cross your mind just for a second? >> no. >> that was deep. >> you know what, i don't care if this turns out to be fake because it cracked me up. >> gorillas in the wind. >>> a clapping cat. ♪ >>> we got to thank one of our viewers tia shields for this video. she
law, not just those indicted by the existing tribunals for rwanda, sierra leone -- >> the house is not order. the speaker pro tempore: the house is not in order. the house is in order. mr. berman: the change is strongly supported by the departments of defense and state. i urge my colleagues to support this important legislation and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlelady from florida is recognized. ms. ros-lehtinen: i yield such time to the gentleman from california, mr. royce, and the author of the original house-side version of this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i thank the gentlelady. and i do think it's important, as we move forward here, to expand the state department's rewards program. we have found a technique that works and if we can deploy this in order to bring joseph coni or use it to bring to the bar of justice some of the international crime figures that would be turned in under this bill, then it could be very, very beneficia
brief. this working and training local communities for self protection was done in rwanda against the fdlr. i am not so sure about doing this in the congo. it is attractive to me, but i guess i would say it depends on the community. i would say the key here is to engage and embrace the congolese government at the most senior level, but not just the presidential level, which is why i keep talking about some kind of by national commission. then you can start penetrating those ministries which have the responsibility, even bring governors over so that you can do at the provincial level. i guess i think that the real heavy lift here is more on the diplomatic side, and working very carefully with the congolese government, which is essentially isolated and does not have much contact with our officials i remember about the army that was not paid -- officials. >> i remember about an army that was not paid. that says an awful lot about the nature and character of society. i think we all agree that if you have a security solution, but does not sit with the situation on the ground, it will s
genocide in rwanda. they raped hundreds of women, chopping apart michildren, massacre of people. that's who the government is teaming up with. congo is really this -- it's like this caldron of abuse on a scale that's unlike just about anywhere else in the world. i cover a number of these conflicts in africa. just about everywhere else things are changing or getting a bit better in some cases. congo has stayed the same for almost ten years and that same is very disturbing state of anarchy. >> congo has enormous resources and the a beautiful lush country. >> it's spectacular. it's one of the most beautiful places i've been ever where. there was a huge volcano with streams of smoke shooting out of it. it's very lush. it's very fertile. the lakes are beautiful. the environment is clean. it's blessed with mineral riches, gold, timber, copper. just about everything. that's part of the reason why we're seeing this fight. the u.s. government has tried to get their hands around this by passing this resource conflict legislation that tries to get their arms around better regulating the minerals that
, there was an outcry over rwanda. there was an outcry in the sudan. we have a record of tolerating african genocide. >> i don't know if it is a really good record. we do have a record. but i think you would all agree that north korea is a uniquely distopian bleak -- it is unbelievable how much of a -- >> are you right. >> it is like another planet. >> i understand what you are saying. it is like we are allowing this weird world to exist, and why is that? >> as it was brought up, a, they have nukes. and b, because they have china. >> despairs the western -- as far as the western mind is earn cked it is an asian thing. >> oh that's what they do out there. >> we defended south korea and lost a lot of lives doing that. we didn't just sit around going, oh it is asia. >> i know. >> and we have 40,000 troops stationed in south korea. >> we are talking a lot about this. >> we should move on. women senators say they would have reached a budget deal. greg, there will be 20 female senators and not 500. they talk so much. >> terrible. >> you cannot add admonish him. >> i can't even tell you how upset i am. >>
find customers here in the united states and the money goes back to the women in rwanda to provide for their families. they created a partnership with j. crew, nicole miller, and ralph lauren. >> the newthing about new africa is it creates distribution channels for these women to have access to consumers that would never have access to their products prior. >> you can buy indigo africa's products online, go to nbcwashington.com and search african gifts. >>> let's get one more check on our weather forecast. doug kammerer is live outside the white house now with the national christmas tree lighting. hey, doug. >> reporter: hey, guys. they just brought up neil patrick harris. you see him right there behind me. he's got on a very nice scarf. if you see neil patrick harris, you know things are about to get started here. they're about to bring up the president in the next couple of minutes to light the national christmas tree. we'll be here right on through the rest of the evening. >> celebrating 90 years of a very special national tradition. calvin coolidge has been part of this terrifi
as it stands given where we've been on certain issues after bosnia, rwanda, there was a sense we would not let these things go without attention and resources and you look at what's happening in syria and it's a complicated issue to be sure but is there an american outcry to the extent that we would have expected to have one, given where we've been on human rights abuses in previous eras? >> i think there is a tremendous amount of compassion and concern by ordinary americans. i hate to say this on this tv show, but you're actually covering those issues and a lot of places just aren't to the extent they used to. i think that's part of the problem. but one example of that is right now, one of the issues we're really working hard on, is this anti-homosexually bill in uganda which would make homosexuality punishable by the death penalty. it's wound its way through the system, on the precipes of being passed. the speaker of the house of representatives says she's going to pass this bill as a gift to the people of uganda by christmas. so the next two and a half weeks are critical and we're not seein
't suggest that everything is perfect in countries like uganda, and rwanda and ethiopia and south africa, but nonetheless, there's been progress in all these places, and we sometimes had to work with people who weren't perfect, but this author made it sound as if she was somehow guilty by association with anything they did wrong, and somehow had picked the wrong people to try to work with. i thought it was an absurd argument, and it sort of contributes to the same tone we've been hearing the last few weeks. >> well, there have been all these things coming out that people have been lobbing her way, and does this need to be resolved one way or the other? the president now we're told might even wait several more weeks before making decisions, not clear whether that's going to take place, but meanwhile, you have john kerry, who is going to be holding hearings on benghazi. hillary clinton is going to be testifying when that report comes out. we expect it by next week at the latest. that is the investigative panel, which will be turned over to the senate and house foreign affairs and foreign r
, and a generation whose inclination was not to intervene, which may have led to rwanda and 800,000 deaths, what lessons are you worried about people taking the wrong lessons from right now in the international arena? >> well, i think that we -- the lesson, i think, is that we do need to take action. the question is, what kind of action. and i am very interested in the way that syria is being approached. in terms of really using -- i teach a course on the national security toolbox. and we look at the various aspects of this, and what's happening is, the u.s. government and the international community is using the tools, operating internationally, getting international pressure, a variety of sanctions that are tighter and tighter. humanitarian assistance and saying that no options are off the table. so i know people talk about appeasement. it has nothing to do -- you know, assad may be a terrible, but he's not hitler. and it's not the same as when the western powers were basically trying to figure out how not to do anything over czechoslovakia, and here we really are trying to do something and be
to breakers and t he mission from giants fan... to get you to this point it is important to that we rwandas' to about here card a word of advice if you're going to go to the strip club and drink? >> what time to start drinking? would that be 1:30 a.m. >> i did not get caught behaving badly. and i am guilty. >> not only did he ignore the officer he was cutting across several lanes of traffic and he was really just running from police. this park is zero tolerance on the clicker did you see this that it has no on -- lockliquor. >> this also had to be opened and dumped. this is the head stone on the creek where bodies were entombed. the oldest was 1930's. >> they tried to break into all three but they only got the one body open. >> let us face it this lady forgot her purse. and the moment that she got at the bay bridge toll plaza. and his driver forgot that she should not be texting. however, she did remember and then forgot again. >> you are going to a to get that with binoculars. >> these three men are building furniture in richmond in broad daylight. it is 2:55. these dogs are playing in the
to prevent crimes against humanity happening. after what has happened in rwanda in the 1990's, and in bosnia, the international community came up with an excellent idea after that, in establishing the international criminal court in july of 2002. after that, the responsibility is to protect in 2005. after that, the international community will understand that if a state cannot commit crimes against its own people. should the international community -- the syrian case officially approve that all of this discussion and all of that was untrue. we have been seeing crimes against humanity. we have been seeing war crimes committed by the regime, day-by- day. children, women -- we see all the time torture. children are being tortured. we have been seeing cases of rape in different areas. we have seen a systematic and widespread policy of targeting organization figures and leaders. these are crimes against amenity. despite all of that, we have five special sessions of the u.n. human rights council in geneva. they come up with strong resolutions that what is happening in syria are crimes against huma
. president clinton had said allowing genocide to happen in rwanda was one of his greatest failures in office. we know the president spent time with bill clinton recently. what is your sense how potent this is for president obama and whether or not he would take the step of taking out these facilities before this could happen? >> well i think we obviously known about the threat of syria's chemical weapons capability for a long time and this conflict has been going on now, getting close to two years. so we're a little bit late in the game to finally be worried about what might happen. in fact, there is actually a bigger risk in my view. it will be a tragedy if the weapons are used against the opposition in syria. but the potential for an even larger tragedy exists if the opposition gets hold of these chemical weapons, the terrorist elements in the opposition and sends them outside syria where they could be used by terrorists around the world. so the threat, although our immediate focus is the risk inside syria, i don't think we can ignore. i think america's focus ought to be the threat expandi
, and shattered to rwanda on the passenger side. >> no rest have been made. the santa clara county sheriff's office asking for the public's help in tracking down the shooter. >> we will be back with more in just a moment. =dj >> we are backed at 70 6:00 a.m.. >> a florida lawmaker has filed a bill to revise the state's controversial stand your ground law. under the proposed measure, people found to be the aggressor in altercations would not be able to seek protection under the self-defense law. >> the bill would allow the force and officers to investigate suspects would both fall under questionable circumstances. >> you will recall, trayvon martin was gunned down in february by neighborhood volunteer watch george zimmerman, who was claiming self-defense under that law. >> is a strange twist about a marine sergeant who stood guard outside the central valley elementary school. >> it turns out that he is not our rain anymore and was never a sergeant. >> sergeant grey puldey started standing guard out side of hughson a limiter's laughter the shooting conn. bv recordings the part of the fans, p
like rwanda and others that are critical to bring stability. there's a huge diplomatic element to this as well. it is critically important that the u.s. and u.n. engaged by high-level envoy to that region to make a critical difference in bringing the partners together. i know that secretary carson has been working on the issue and others have as well. this is something that does matter to us. there is incredible opportunity , economic opportunity for trade, partnerships with u.s. businesses, but we have to give them stability in order to take advantage of those opportunities. i thank the chairman for having this hearing and learning what more can do to help the situation in the eastern drc. >> thank you, i yield back. >> we will have two panels today. the first panel, we have assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs. the honorable john carson, assistant secretary of state for the bureau of african affairs. >> thank you, members of the committee. thank you for the opportunity to discuss the urgent crisis and the did not -- in the democratic republic of c
on the conflict in the democratic republic of congo. and rwanda's involvement in that country. u.n. security council experts alleged rwanda support of rebels against the congolese army after last month's cease of the city of gomea by a rebel military group. that hearing by house foreign affairs subcommittee will begin live at 3:00 p.m. eastern. you can see it on c-span3. also a look at the republican party in the 113th congress. hear remarks from republican congressman jim jordan and steve scalise on the future of the conservative movement. they'll be speaking 3:30 eastern right here on c-span. >> belittle me. strangle me. >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us i think in this country, we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this if he none none that so many of us -- phenomenon that so many of us experienced one way or another and had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people will starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of g
of the most beautiful modern housing communities in the world. it's a massive city. it's outside of rwanda, angola. the government had to build this to solve its housing shortage, but very few can actually afford to live there. cnn's dave mckenzie takes us inside a high-rise ghosttown. ♪ >> this is the promise of a new angola. the government propaganda video shows the scale of the new city. ♪ the chinese got. it's quite extraordinary. some five years ago there was absolutely nothing here. just bush. in that time they have schools and medical centers, kindergartens and tens of thousands of apartments. built using angola's oil credit lines with china. the final touches are still being made. but there are highways without cars. schools with no pupils. it feels like a ghosttown. we eventually found someone who had bought a flat. >> so you live in this apartment building? which -- where is your apartment? on the seventh floor. wow. and this building, is it completely filled? >> no, no. >> translator: no. we have through residents in this building. three apartments occupied. >> reporter: is
initially in haiti and rwanda and malawi. they used diesel generators because they had no choice to power the hospital. we told them this is a better way. it will cost more up front with a solar solution, but over time they're actually saving money, lots of money. so it's not just a more sustainable way took economicabeconomica economical economically. it's a smarter way. >> this is about a project in west africa, because it's not just the power and lights. it is a whole revolution in irrigation. take a look. >> thanks to irrigation, the production is multiplied by ten. the crops are more varied and today maize, tomatoes or salad even grow here. >> these women can now feed their families all year-round but also earn money and rise from poverty by selling their crops on the markets. commerce has appeared thanks to solar power, a first step towards development. >> you and i met a few years ago, and you told me about this project. i feel like you should have a budget of a billion dollars. i'm serious. it does seem to me like this is -- we have a -- it's such a crazy conversation about energy
anything as far as rwanda and the generocide that goes on. >> he blames himself. >> he knew what was going on. he made that decision not to intervene and 800,000 or so people were slaughtered as a result of that. i went with him to those countries in 1998. susan rice was with me on that trip as well as assistant secretary for african affairs. he blames himself. >> to retroactively turn that on susan rice is ridiculous. >> that's a former situation that obviously the former president of the united states knows very, very well. piers morgan will have the full interview tonight at 9:00 p.m. eastern. i think you're going to want to watch this important interview. piers is going to join us in our 6:00 p.m. eastern hour as well. >>> both egyptians that despise the government are venting on the streets. like a lot of things, trying to find a better job can be frustrating. so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we lea
into question and she was in the national security council back in 1993 when rwanda kicked off and she made a controversial comment about, well, if we call it a genocide and don't act. what will be the implications on the november mid term election? and if you hook at-- and then later on, reflexively supported the regime in ruwan da when there were more war crimes committed and since vowed to heal that, but, you know, you've seen her political statements recently that showed there's a political side of susan rice and willingness for talking points that we can't afford as secretary of state and john kerry, he was part of the foreign senate relations committee and he was back in the late 60's and talked about war crimes that he reportedly saw against the vietnam war and you have some track records that don't make them the best fit. >> there are numerous republicans, john mccain, lindsey graham, a barraso who sates i would support john kerry as secretary of state who in their words would cruise through a nomination. and how would an affect if those two are in place? >> if you like what's in th
and post conflict nations such as rwanda and boss kneea. the i.n.s. -- bosnia. the institute allows students to receive an education at laroche college to study leadership and diplomacy in return for their agreement to return to their host country, home country, after graduation to help engage in the peace process and rebuild their nations. the institute successfully reflects the college's vision and mission to foster global citizenship. and that program over the years has created a bond with some of these countries, it is unlike any other institution of higher learning, in america. it has had students go through the program that have gone back to their home countries, that have very successfully become leaders in those countries and we are better off as a nation and as a global community because of their work and because of that program which initiated and continues at laroche college. it was also during my time on the board of trustees in 2004 that laroche college board of trustees appointed sister decasio as the college's seventh president. she began her career in education at la
hurdle on the coleco rwanda would lead them to fight even if they lose damascus and as they put additional pressures on the unity of the syrian state and we certainly do not want to see the syrian state disintegrate. it goes back into this question of how to convince the community that it has a role in the future of syria like others in their doesn't have to be a genocide. i was struck by the editorial or an opinion piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or
weapon ban, so-called. every gun is an assault weapon. the machetes in uganda, or i'm sorry, rwanda, the worst genocide that we know of in human history. 800,000 or so, with a ma -- with machetes. of course we know during world war ii, the genocide wasn't just 800,000, it was millions. six million jews, killed by all kinds of means. so we need to be smart about the way we deal with this issue of mass murders and violence in our society. everything should be on the table. and as we continue to remember the loved ones of those who were victims of the tragedy at newtown, connecticut, things go on here in this town. this body, we've been alerted tomorrow, will vote on what's being called plan b. plan a was to try to reach an agreement with the president. but from my experience as an attorney, i've negotiated small deals, multimillion dollar deals, i have certified -- i was district judge, chief justice, certified mediator, i don't know if there's anybody else in the congressional body that's been through the training and process of becoming an international arbitrator. and a lot of expe
statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranked no. 1. if you look around the markets, you will see the authority. 90% of the world's population. they're going to see improvements in those lives. there will be issues, but the story is very strong and that is why we are seeing the story being very positive. >> tell us about the frontier markets because you cite the story of capital labor productivity. it will explode very dramatically? >> i think there is a clear delineation between the advanced emerging economies and the frontier economies, but our related or integrated it is to the developed market, how much exposure do they have? in terms of trade and foreign direct investment, it is heavily dependent on the united states and europe. africa has 1 billion people and is less than 2% of world trade or direct investment. the real engine of growth is not going to be trade, unfortunately. if you look at valuations of the bank's and trading in the local market, the story is credible and hits to the story rather than be
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